Craft Over Art: or how I learned to stop worrying and love my ugly UI

As I mentioned last week, I have a tendency to try to make products out of projects; meaning I can’t just have something to tinker with for fun, it needs to essentially be a rough draft for the actual project I have to work on. In the same vein, I have another hang-up on wanting things to be clean and pretty to start. Now, of course, one should strive for well formatted code following best practices, but specifically for those projects with a user interface I try to go straight to a finished product from the start. As a result, the Craft Over Art Pattern was illuminating, bringing into focus where my priorities should lie especially in contrast to where they are currently.

In sum, this pattern emphasizes that you have been charged with creating a functioning product, not necessarily a pretty one. The line, “the things we build for customers can be beautiful, but must be useful” says it all. I realize in constantly polishing a project before its feature complete, I end up throwing away a lot of work spent on “dolling up” features or elements of the user interface that may change or not even be used. I even caught myself making the same mistake even on a personal project using a different web application language, where I did not even attempt to make any forms or methods that communicated to the backend, instead spending time adding libraries for user interface elements that look nice and animate well. While there is certainly a place for those things, this pattern helps one understand that is when you have all of the parts of your application finalized.

I should have learned this lesson last semester with my final project. I spent so much time fiddling with the color palette and page animations, that the content on those pages was barren, or poorly formatted. It is nice, I think, that my webpage looks and animates nicely, but when pages break upon reloading then it hardly matters. If there is constantly some expectation of failure with a project, then the font you choose is hardly relevant. I think that is what this pattern helped me realize most about this weakness of mine; utility is the most important aspect of software, everything else is so much fluff.

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